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Wake Up Call Slow Magic Remix



  • Rhythm Game DanceDanceRevolution in its earlier years has "Paranoia" on Basic, a level 6 (on the pre-Dance Dance Revolution X scale). It's 180 beats per minute (which when it first appeared on DDR "1st Mix" made it the fastest song in the game) and features a handful of eighth notes (including a nasty "jackhammer" note section at the end). If you can clear this song, you're on your way to taking on more difficult songs. Moving past the intermediate difficulty starts introducing higher usage of 1/8 notes and more complex patterns or other quirks to upset your rhythm.

  • DJMAX Technika: In Popular Mode, each stage has a different songlist, with the minimum song difficulty getting higher with each of the three stages. If you're new to the game, you'll most likely pick "Jupiter Driving" as your stage 3 song. It's a level-4 song, is the easiest stage 3 song, and teaches you to handle patterns in which the timing line moves at double speed.

  • "Area 7" on the first stage is a song whose repeat notes look awkward. You'll need to understand their rhythm rather than just relying on the timing line in order to survive this song.

  • "Canned Heat" in Elite Beat Agents on Cruisin' mode. The songs before it have relatively simple and consistent rhythms, but "Canned Heat" has a strange disco beat with syncopated rhythms everywhere. Because of this, most players mark it as the first song they ever fail. In Sweatin' and Hard ROCK! modes, it can happen as early as "Rock This Town".

  • Everhood: Zigg is the third fight in the entire game after Mr. Frog and the Automated Terror Machine, and they're a step up in difficulty. They're the first opponent with projectiles that can't be jumped, they sweep large areas of the field with their Eye Beams, and their fight is much longer, to the point of giving the player a checkpoint in between.

  • The second Rasta Beast fight. For the first half of the game, you only need to dodge the notes thrown at you in fights. However, in the second half a new mechanic is introduced- using Red's arm to grab two notes of the same color and throw them back at the boss. The first few bosses with this gimmick are pretty easy to accustom you to it, but once you reach Rasta Beast, that changes. The boss combines a strict time limit with plenty of mirror notes that you cannot jump over and that block your attacks, and has two sections where they shoot very fast-moving notes at you. It's not too hard once you get the hang of it, but it will likely take a first-time player many tries to do so, and is indicative of just how hard the bosses will be from that point, so you better have gotten the hang of the new mechanic or you will not go any further.

  • Gitaroo Man has the first battle against Ben-K, which is purely guard phase (read: hitting a flurry of notes coming in from all directions). The notes come at you fast and thick, with a rather irregular rhythm, leading most rookie players to complete it with barely a sliver of health to spare if they pass it at all. In Master Play, it can happen as early as Flying O, which, mind you, is the second stage.

  • In Guitar Hero III, Tom Morello serves as a wake-up call boss, and not in a good way. He demonstrates how boss battles in this game will be determined by random chance. Surprisingly, though, he is actually easier to defeat on higher difficulties, seeing as in Easy and Medium mode the notes are simply stretched too far and few in between for players to be able to do significant damage by making him miss these notes.

  • Rhythm Heaven: Remix 2 in Fever. The first remix is nicely paced enough to help the player get used to the "no practice" nature of Remixes. The second remix is faster, but only lasts about a minute, meaning that just a few mistakes can cause you to fail the song and have to start over.

  • In Megamix, the Machine Remix can trip some players up due to 16th note beats during the Rhythm Tweezers sections that aren't present in the original stage.

  • Friday Night Funkin': "Dad Battle", the final song of Week 1. Up until now, you had songs with relatively easy-to-hit note charts, with Fresh having a couple tricky beat-boxing sections. This song is where The Father, and by extension the game, takes off the gloves and puts on the anvils. It's fast paced, has a very tough chart, and introduces concepts of both rapid firing up to 3 different notes in succession and harmonizing with your opponent while they hit notes. Better get used to these quirks because starting with Week 2, each song will have at least two of them in play, if not all four.





Wake Up Call Slow Magic Remix


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  • Sports Game In Arc Style: Baseball!! 3D, Fujieda and his pitching teammates from the Rhinos let you know that the game is not all about hitting slow fastballs in the center of the strike zone. The implementation of the forkball and pitching around the strike zone can really surprise you after 3 Easier Than Easy games.

  • The Dallas Mavericks and Minnesota Timberwolves, the first two teams you face in NBA Jam, qualify as these. In both the original and the tournament edition, the Mavericks are one of the fastest and most efficient shooting teams in the game; Jamal Mashburn (or Mike Iuzzolino) can easily make players' lives a living hell. The T'Wolves can slip up a careless player in the Tournament Edition due to the fact that Christian Laettner and Chuck Person sink 90% of their shots to end a quarter. And when you get to the Charlotte Hornets, the game tells you: "welcome to Hell." Larry Johnson and Alonzo Mourning are Lightning Bruisers who can shoot the lights out, while Hersey Hawkins cannot be discounted thanks to his own speed and shooting ability.

  • Winnie the Pooh's Home Run Derby has Kanga and Roo. Eeyore, Lumpy, and Piglet all throw extreme fastballs that Pooh must home run each and every time... but at least they're flying straight. Kanga and Roo are the first of the 8 stages to start throwing physics-defying balls that move so erratically you'll strike out well before you even have a chance to compete. Owl becomes one after the relatively "easy" Breather Boss that is Rabbit as his start to zigzag through the air and requires Pooh to have split-second reactions to hit them.



  • Third-Person Shooter Resident Evil 4 features a wicked and terrifying early encounter with the chainsaw-wielding Dr. Salvador. Aside from being horrifying, this nasty enemy probably killed 90% of gamers the first time they set foot into the opening village, because his chainsaw will instantly behead you if he gets close, and he has a whopping 40HP at a stage when your handgun only does 1 point per shot. Players can avoid this encounter by passing up the shotgun during the opening shootout and avoiding the eastern path out of the village (yes, if you really screw up you'll potentially have to deal with two of them), which given you have only a weak pistol and a couple of grenades is a sort of wake up call in itself.

  • Resident Evil 5 concludes the first level with the Executioner, whose hard-hitting reinforcements continually respawn until the timer expires, and who wields a gargantuan axe that will One-Hit Kill players on Veteran and Professional.

  • Robokill has the miniboss from the third mission firing bullets powerful enough to blast you to pieces in one salvo. It's the first battle in which it is necessary to either continually dodge fire or utilize cover, as the opponent's high HP and fast movements mean it won't go down easily.

  • Splatoon 2 has the 2nd boss, Octo Samurai, who attacks with a random pattern of moves and requires a lot more damage to take down. He's especially a wake-up call for players who played the first game, as he doesn't follow the "attack with a series of obviously telegraphed moves" method used by almost every boss there.

  • Vanquish's Bogey, despite only being the second boss, can be very frustrating, having high HP, fast flight ability making it difficult to hit with the heavier weapons, Roboteching beam spams just like the player's Lock-On Laser, EMP bombs that cause Sam's armor to overheat, a plasma Chest Blaster that can OneHitKill, and to top it off, a Press X to Not Die sequence at the end.

  • Warframe has either a Conculyst or Battlyst (the game will choose one or the other) during the quest The Second Dream, which is the first Sentient-type enemy the player will encounter. What makes it this trope? Besides having access to some very high damaging attacks, they also adapt to any damage inflicted on them, making them take up to ninety percent less damage from any damage type used against them. Worst of all? This "boss" is a mook, and you will be fighting more later, which are just as strong as it is, if not even tougher.



  • Other Chapter 2's Samurai Goroh from F-Zero GX Story Mode, as he employs Rubber-Band A.I. in the worst ways possible after a relatively calm Chapter 1.

  • It's more a mission than a boss per se, but the second half of the mission "Mr. Phillips" in Grand Theft Auto V certainly counts. After playing relatively tame missions as Franklin and Michael up to this point in the game, You're given control of Trevor for the first time, and have access to a special ability that allows you to No-Sell damage to some extent, but you have to go up against an entire trailer park of heavily armed Lost M.C. bikers. Even with the special ability, it's quite easy to get overwhelmed and wasted, so you have to pick some strategy in addition to going in guns blazing.

  • The first time the player encounters the titular Nemesis in Resident Evil 3: Nemesis will show players why it's usually in their best interest to avoid this monstrosity. It can take a beating, and can throw Jill around like a ragdoll. It will also instantly kill her if her health is merely in caution as opposed to danger. The times you fight him in the city are a wakeup call because you have to A: learn his patterns, master the dodge mechanic, and use your gunpowder and reloading tool so that you have enough of the stronger munitions to take him out; and B: prepare for encounters with him that aren't optional. At this stage in the game, you are armed with the basic pistol and a shotgun, and if you want the drops he gives, you will have to take him out.

Non-Video Game examples 041b061a72


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